Tag Archives: Intertextuality

RIP Gérard Genette (1930-2018)

I am very saddened by the death of Gérard Genette (1930-2018). Genette, for me, was one of most rewarding of French literary theorists. He employed a structuralist methodology but in a way that avoided metaphysical excesses and that never lost … Continue reading

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CFP: Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth, Kingston University, 11 November 2017

Only a week left before the deadline for proposals for this conference on Stephen King, Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth, Kingston University, 11 November 2017. In Stephen King’s Gothic (2011) John Sears asserts that rereading King represents ‘an … Continue reading

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Reworking Myth and Fairytale in YA Literature–Again!

If you visit this site often, you’ll know that many of the Gothic and fantastic narratives that OGOM research involve reworkings and rewritings of fairy tales or myths. The transformations and interminglings of genre involved fascinate me on a formal … Continue reading

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Beauty and Beastliness: Intertextuality, genre mutation, and utopian possibilities in paranormal romance

We now have a repository where we hope to make talks and other research outputs available. I’ve uploaded my talk, ‘Beauty and Beastliness: Intertextuality, genre mutation, and utopian possibilities in paranormal romance‘, which I gave recently at the excellent ‘Damsels … Continue reading

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Angela Carter — Resources

Still commemorating Angela Carter, twenty-five years after her death, here are some more useful links: Here’s a great article by John Dugdale on Carter’s legacy, including her influence in music: ‘Angela’s influence: what we owe to Carter‘ (though some connections … Continue reading

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The Icelandic Dracula

Fascinating article by Hans Corneel de Roos on an Icelandic vampire novel from 1900 which has a curious hypertextual relationship with Bram Stoker’s Dracula (‘hypertextual’ is Gérard Genette’s term for that variety of intertextuality where one text is modelled on … Continue reading

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Cultural Afterlives of Frankenstein

Great post by Megen de Bruin-Molé–Cultural Afterlives of Frankenstein–on why works last and the enduring nature of the Frankenstein myth, traced from Mary Shelley’s novel through its myriad descendants and adaptations.

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CFP: Damsels in Redress: Women in Contemporary Fairy-Tale Reimaginings, Queen’s University Belfast, 7-8 April 2017

Reworkings of classic fairy tales is one of OGOM’s principal areas of research (and a favourite topic of my own). This conference at QU Belfast, Damsels in Redress: Women in Contemporary Fairy-Tale Reimaginings looks very exciting. I’ve posted about this … Continue reading

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Strange Worlds: The Vision of Angela Carter, RWA, Bristol, 10 Dec 16 – 19 Mar 17

Angela Carter is a key figure in the OGOM Project (as you might guess from the many postings here about her). Her explorations of the marvellous and the fabulous, her intertextuality and play with genres, her concerns with the metamorphoses … Continue reading

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Fairy tales and contemporary fiction

An interesting article, ‘Follow the breadcrumbs: why fairytales are magic for modern fiction‘, by Lincoln Michel (author of Upright Beasts). It discusses  from a writer’s perspective the opportunities that modern reworkings of fairy tales have as an alternative to straightforward … Continue reading

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