Tag Archives: Eighteenth century

CFPs: Magical cities, coastal folklore, folk horror, folklore and the fantastic, Walpole

Some more CFPs to tempt you: 1. From the brilliant people at Supernatural Cities (who were such good partners at our Urban Weird conference in April this year), the Magical Cities conference, 15 June 2019, University of Portsmouth. Deadline: 31 … Continue reading

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Gothic Palgrave Handbook – Expressions of interest

Clive Bloom is calling for expressions of interest in contributing to this three-volume Gothic handbook. This this will be a very exciting project to be involved with. Please email Professor Bloom directly with ideas or any questions at: cbloom4189@aol.com: As … Continue reading

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Archive of 6,000 Historical Children’s Books

The University of Florida have digitised the 6,000 children’s books of their Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature and made them available on line for free. This is a marvellous resource and I have added it to the Related Links list … Continue reading

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Dale Townshend and MMU Gothic Festival

Two great news items from the Manchester Centre for Gothic Studies at Manchester Metropolitan University. First, the brilliant Dale Townshend, who has moved from Stirling to become Professor at MMU, will be giving his inaugural lecture, From ‘Castles in the Air’ … Continue reading

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Roger Luckhurst, ‘The birth of the vampyre: Dracula and mythology in Early Modern Europe’

An extract here from Roger Luckhurst’s excellent introduction to the OUP World’s Classics edition of Dracula. The notion that the vampire is universal and archetypal is debunked, and its origins shown to lie in the Enlightenment response to folkloric panics … Continue reading

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An Exploration of Eighteenth Century and Victorian Gothic Literature Displays With the Exhibition Curators

If you not yet seen the fabulous Darkness and Light Exhibition on Gothic culture at the John Rylands Library in Manchester, do go if you can. But why not go along to this event on 23 October (15.00-16.00) and see … Continue reading

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Roger Luckhurst, ‘From Dracula to The Strain: Where do vampires come from?’

A brilliant, concise overview of the origins of contemporary vampire narratives by Prof, Roger Luckhurst of Birkbeck College, London. He traces the vampire story from the Eats European accounts in the eighteenth-century through Polidori, Varney the Vampire, ‘Carmilla’ and (inevitably) … Continue reading

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Darkness and Light: Exploring the Gothic exhibition, John Rylands Library, Manchester

Being in the centre of Manchester for the first time in months, I thought I’d drop in to the beautiful Victorian neo-Gothic John Rylands Library and see the Darkness and Light: Exploring the Gothic exhibition. It’s very, very good, with … Continue reading

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What do botany and vampirism have in common?

Literature and science is a field that has always interested me and Professor Martin Willis has just published Literature and Science: Reader’s Guide to Essential Criticism. This will be of interest to Company of Wolves delegates as it has a … Continue reading

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Phantasmagoria : The Dark Side of the Light

A fascinating short film with Mervyn Heard on the spooky spectacle of the late eighteenth-century/early nineteenth-century phantasmagoria and its uncanny foreshadowings of cinematic thrills. If this whets your appetite, come to the OGOM Company of Wolves Conference in September–we will … Continue reading

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